Batch convert Global security groups to Universal

Recently I came across a need to batch convert global security groups into universal security groups in my work’s Active Directory domain. The reason for this is so I could then turn them into Mail Enabled security groups, which would enable mail to be delivered to members of these groups. Unfortunately all security groups at this organization are Global in scope.

Seeing as this is a one domain organization there is no harm in changing the scope to Universal. Doing this via mouse is very tedious; fortunately we can use a few basic command line tools to automate the task. Thanks to Jeff Guillet for outlining how to do this.

The three magic commands are: dsquery, dsget, and dsmod.

First I wanted to test out a single security group to make sure everything would work. I couldn’t convert it because it was a member of several global security groups. This rabbit hole went several levels deep. Piping together dsquery, dsget, and dsmod all together solved this problem instantly:

dsquery group -limit 0 -name "<Group Name>" | dsget group -memberof | dsmod group -c -q -scope u

The above command first gets the full name of the group specified by the -name command. The output is sent to the dsget command to query what groups that group is a member of. The output of that command is sent to the dsmod command, which does the work of actually changing each of those groups into a security group:

  • -c tells it to continue on error
  • -q tells it to not print successful changes.
  • -scope u instructs it to change the group’s scope to Universal.

Any errors will be printed to the console. Depending on how many levels of global groups there are you may have to run this command several times in order to convert the problematic groups to Universal scope.

Once that command finishes without error you can modify the group itself to be a universal group by simply omitting the middle dsget command:

dsquery group -limit 0 -name "<Group Name>" | dsmod group -c -q -scope u

After testing we are now ready to expand this to convert ALL Global security groups to be Universal in scope. If you would like a report of how many groups would be affected, run this command. It will output all groups from the query to the text file Groups.txt:

dsquery group -limit 0 | dsget group -samid -scope -secgrp > Groups.txt

To modify every group simply omit the “-name” parameter from the group command used above with our test group. This will iterate through every group in the directory and pass it on to dsmod which will modify the scope to be universal:

dsquery group -limit 0 | dsmod group -c -q -scope u

Some built-in groups can’t be converted due to their nature, so you will have to work around those (Domain Users being one example.) You will probably need to run the command a few times until no errors appear.

Profit.

 

XAPI won’t start in Xenserver 7

I came home yesterday to discover that every last one of my VMs were unresponsive. It was most distressing. I couldn’t even SSH into my xenserver – it was unresponsive too. Its physical console had dropped into an emergency shell. A reboot allowed me to get a physical console again, but my networking and VMs would not start.

In trying to pick up the pieces and put everything back together I ran

systemctl --failed

which revealed several key services not running – namely openvswitch and xapi (very important services.) Manually starting them did nothing – they would silently fail and immediately quit working.

After banging my head against a wall for a bit (I really didn’t want to restore from backup) I stumbled across this post. It states in essence that xapi won’t start if the disk is full. I checked disk usage and it said I had a few gigs free, but thought I’d try the steps in the post anyway.

ls /var/log

revealed quite a lot of log files. I then decided to just delete all the .gz archived logs:

rm /var/log/*.gz

After doing this, xapi started. I restarted the hypervisor for good measure and everything came up – all back to normal as if nothing had happened.

It’s incredibly frustrating that Xenserver is designed to be a ticking time bomb with default configuration. If you don’t take care to manually delete old logs, or alternatively send logs to a remote log server, it will crash and burn. This is stupid. That being said, I was impressed that it recovered so gracefully once I freed up some disk space.

If you’re running xenserver, make sure you’re logging somewhere else – or put a cron job to delete old log files!

 

Mount folder from another system over SSH

I recently had a need to mount a folder over SSH to allow my file manager to browse through the files on a remote system. Two great resources led me to the solution to this problem: sshfs

I first came across this little tutorial on how to install sshfs on my shiny new Linux Mint 18 box:

sudo apt-get install sshfs
sudo mkdir /mnt/droplet #<--replace "droplet" with whatever you prefer
sudo sshfs -o allow_other,defer_permissions root@xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx:/ /mnt/droplet

Pretty slick. If you want to use a keyfile instead of being prompted for a password, you can use the IdentityFile option:

sudo sshfs -o allow_other,defer_permissions,IdentityFile=~/.ssh/id_rsa root@xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx:/ /mnt/droplet

You can have this handled in /etc/fstab for automounting. Thanks to this Arch Linux guide for the info. (The command below requires systemd.)

user@host:/remote/folder /mount/point  fuse.sshfs noauto,x-systemd.automount,_netdev,users,idmap=user,IdentityFile=/home/user/.ssh/id_rsa,allow_other,reconnect 0 0

I tweaked my /etc/fstab file a bit because it complained that allow_other required a configuration change. Since I’m the only user of this box it didn’t matter to me. Here is my configuration:

nicholas@remote:/ /home/desktop/remote fuse.sshfs noauto,x-systemd.automount,_netdev,users,idmap=user,IdentityFile=/home/desktop/.ssh/keyfile,reconnect 0 0

I’m mounting the root folder of my remote machine into a folder named remote on my desktop machine. I generated ssh keyfiles so that no password was required. Now the mount shows up under “Devices” in my file manager and a simple click mounts the folder gets me there. Sweet.