Tag Archives: grep

Change ZFS based NFS SR address in Xenserver

I recently acquired a shiny new set of SSDs to host my VMs. The problem is I needed to create a new ZFS array to accommodate them. I needed to figure out a way to migrate my VMs to the new array and then instruct Xenserver to use the new array instead of the old one.

Fortunately with a bit of research I learned this is fairly painless. Thanks to this discussion on citrix forums that got me pointed in the right direction. To change the server / IP address of an existing NFS storage repository in Xenserver you must do the following:

  • Shut down affected VMs
  • Shutdown any VMs using NFS SRs
  • Copy the NFS SRs (the directories containing the .vhd files) to the new NFS server
  • xe pbd-unplug uuid=<uuid of pbd pointing to the NFS SR>
  • xe pbd-destroy uuid=<uuid of pbd pointing to the NFS SR>
  • xe pbd-create host-uuid=<uuid of Xen Host> sr-uuid=<uuid of the NFS SR> device-config-server=<New NFS server name> device-config-serverpath=<NFS Share Name>
  • xe pbd-plug uuid=<uuid of the pbd created above>
  • Reboot the VMs using NFS SRs

In my case since my VMs were on an existing ZFS volume with snapshots I wanted to preserve, I used ZFS send and receive to transfer data from my old array to my SSD array. Bonus: I was able to do this while the VMs were still running to ensure minimal downtime. My ZFS copy procedure was as follows:

  • Create recursive snapshot of my VM dataset
    zfs snapshot -r storage/VMs@migrate
  • Start the initial data transfer (this took quite some time to finish)
    zfs send -R storage/VMs@migrate | zfs recv ssd/VMs
  • Do another incremental snapshot and transfer after initial huge transfer is complete (this took much less time to do)
    zfs snapshot -r storage/VMs@migrate2
    zfs send -R -i storage/VMs@migrate storage/VMs@migrate2 | zfs recv ssd/VMs
  • Shutdown all affected VMs and do one more ZFS snapshot & transfer to ensure consistent data:
    zfs snapshot -r storage/VMs@migrate3
    zfs send -R -i storage/VMs@migrate2 storage/VMs@migrate3 | zfs recv ssd/VMs

In the above examples my source dataset was storage/VMs and the destination dataset was ssd/VMs.

Once the data was all transferred to the new location it was time to tell Xenserver about it. I had enough VMs that it was worth my time to write a little script to do it. It’s quick and dirty but it did the job. Behold:

#!/bin/bash
#Author: Nicholas Jeppson
#A simple script to change a xenserver NFS storage repository address to a new location
#Modify NFS_SERVER, NFS_PATH and/or NFS_VERSION to match your environment. 
#Run this script on each xenserver host in your pool. Empty output means the transfer was successful.
#This script takes one argument - the name of the SR to be transferred.

SR_NAME="$1"

NFS_SERVER=10.0.0.1
NFS_PATH=/mnt/ssd/VMs/$SR_NAME
NFS_VERSION=4

#Use sed and awk to grab necessary UUIDs
HOST_UUID=$(xe host-list|egrep -B3 `hostname`$ | grep uuid | awk '{print $5}')
PBD_UUID=$(xe pbd-list|grep -A4 -B4 $SR_NAME | grep -B2 $HOST_UUID |grep -w '^uuid ( RO)' | awk '{print $5}')
SR_UUID=$(xe pbd-list|grep -A4 -B4 $SR_NAME | grep -A2 $HOST_UUID | grep 'sr-uuid' | awk '{print $4}')

#Unplug & destroy old NFS location, create new NFS location
xe pbd-unplug uuid=$PBD_UUID
xe pbd-destroy uuid=$PBD_UUID
NEW_PBD_UUID=$(xe pbd-create host-uuid=$HOST_UUID sr-uuid=$SR_UUID device-config-server=$NFS_SERVER device-config-serverpath=$NFS_PATH device-config-nfsversion=$NFS_VERSION)
xe pbd-plug uuid=$NEW_PBD_UUID

Download the script here (right click / save as)

You can run this script in a simple for loop with something like this:

for SR in <list of SR names separated by a space>; do bash <name of script saved from above> $SR; done

If you named the above script nfs-migrate.sh, and you had three SRs to change (blog1, blog2, blog3) then it would be:

for SR in blog1 blog2 blog3; do bash nfs-migrate.sh $SR; done

After I migrated the data and ran that script, my VMs booted up using the new SSD array. Success.

Find top 10 requests returning 404 errors

I had a website where I was curious what the top 10 URLs that were returning 404s were along with how many hits those URLs got. This was after a huge site redesign so I was curious what old links were still trying to be accessed.

Getting a report on this can be accomplished with nothing more than the Linux command line and the log file you’re interested in. It involves combining grep, sed, awk, sort, uniq, and head commands. I enjoyed how well these tools work together so I thought I’d share. Thanks to this site for giving me the inspiration to do this.

This is the command I used to get the information I wanted:

grep '404' _log_file_ | sed 's/, /,/g' | awk {'print $7'} | sort | uniq -c | sort -n -r | head -10

Here is a rundown of each command and why it was used:

  • grep ‘404’ _log_file_ (replace with filename of your apache, tomcat, or varnish access log.) grep reads a file and returns all instances of what you want, in this case I’m looking for the number 404 (page not found HTTP error)
  • sed ‘s/, /,/g’ Sed will edit a stream of text in any way that you specify. The command I gave it (s/, /,/g) tells sed to look for instances of commas followed by spaces and replace them with just commas (eliminating the space after any comma it sees.) This was necessary in my case because sometimes the source IP address field has multiple IP addresses and it messed up the results. This may be optional if your server isn’t sitting behind any type of reverse proxy.
  • awk {‘print $7’} Awk has a lot of similar functions to sed – it allows you to do all sorts of things to text. In this case we’re telling awk to only display the 7th column of information (the URL requested in apache and varnish logs is the 7th column)
  • sort This command (absent of arguments) sorts our results alphabetically, which is necessary for the next command to work properly.
  • uniq -c This command eliminates any duplicates in the results. The -c argument adds a number indicating how many times that unique string was found.
  • sort -n -r Sorts the results in reverse alphabetical order. The -n argument sorts things numerically so that 2 follows 1 instead of 10. -r Indicates to reverse the order so the highest number is at the top of the results instead of the default which is to put the lowest number first.
  • head -10 outputs the top 10 results. This command is optional if you want to see all the results instead of the top 10. A similar command is tail – if you want to see the last results instead.

This was my output – exactly what I was looking for. Perfect.

2186 http://<sitename>/source/quicken/index.ini
2171 http://<sitename>/img/_sig.png
1947 http://<sitename>/img/email/email1.aspx
1133 http://<sitename>/source/quicken/index.ini
830 http://<sitename>/img/_sig1.png
709 https://<sitename>/img/email/email1.aspx
370 http://<sitename>/apple-touch-icon.png
204 http://<sitename>/apple-touch-icon-precomposed.png
193 http://<sitename>/About-/Plan.aspx
191 http://<sitename>/Contact-Us.aspx

The power of find, grep, and xargs

Recently I needed to find folders with two different things in the path – mysql and DB. I toyed around with a bunch of options but finally settled on using xargs. I don’t use it much. I should use it more.

The command below takes output from find, greps it twice (thus looking for things that have both terms in them) and then creates a symbolic link of the results.

 find . -type d | grep mysql | grep DB | xargs -n 1 ln -s

This accomplished what I needed quite well. In a huge stash of folders there were a subset that contained both the words mysql and DB in their paths that  I was interested in. Find, grep, and xargs to the rescue.

Grep handy tips

I found some grep flags that are really handy and wanted to write them down.

Only list exact matches:  -w

When I run the “netstat -an | grep LISTEN” command it would include all text that included LISTEN – including LISTENING, which I didn’t want to see. Appending -w to the netstat command makes sure grep only displays exact matches.

netstat -an | grep -w LISTEN

Include extra lines above and below the match: -A, -B

When administering xenserver systems it’s often useless to use grep defaults because Xen likes to include relevant information on different lines. To fix this, use the -A and/or the -B flags to specify the number of lines after (A) or before (B) to include in the results. A real world example using grep to return the 3 lines above and below the line matching the word Splunk:

xe vdi-list | grep -A3 -B3 Splunk