Tag Archives: NFS

Using ProxMox as a NAS

Lately I’ve been very unhappy with latest FreeBSD causing reboots randomly during disk resilvering. I simply cannot tolerate random reboots of my fileserver. This fact combined with the migration of OpenZFS to the ZFS on Linux code base means it’s time for me to move from a FreeBSD based ZFS NAS to a Linux-based one.

Sadly there aren’t many options in this space yet. I wanted something where basic tasks were taken care of, like what FreeNAS does, but also supports ZFS. The solution I settled on was ProxMox, which is a hypervisor, but it also has ZFS support.

The biggest drawback of ProxMox vs FreeNAS is the GUI. There are some disk-related GUI options in ProxMox, but mostly it’s VM focused. Thus, I had to configure my required services via CLI.

Following are the settings I used when I configured my NAS to run ProxMox.

Repo setup

If you don’t want to pay for a proxmox license, change the PVE enterprise repository to the free version by modifying /etc/apt/sources.list.d/pve-enterprise.list to the following:

deb http://download.proxmox.com/debian/pve buster pve-no-subscription

Then run at apt update & apt upgrade.

Email alerts

Postfix configuration

Edit /etc/postfix/main.cf and tweak your mail server config as needed (relayhost). Restart postfix after editing:

systemctl restart postfix

Forward mail for root to your own email

Edit /etc/aliases and add an alias for root to forward to your desired e-mail address. Add this line:

root: YOUR_EMAIL_ADDRESS

Afterward run:

newaliases

ZFS configuration

Pool Import

Import the pool using the zpool import -f command (-f to force import despite having been active in a different system)

zpool import -f  

By default they’re imported into the main root directory (/). If you want to have them go to /mnt, use the zfs set mountpoint command:

zfs set mountpoint=/mnt/ 

Monitoring

Install and configure zfs-zed

apt install zfs-zed

Modify /etc/zfs/zed.d/zed.rc and uncomment ZED_EMAIL_ADDR, ZED_EMAIL_PROG, and ZED_EMAIL_OPTS. Edit them to suit your needs (default values work fine, they just need to be uncommented.) Optionally uncomment ZED_NOTIFY_VERBOSE and change to 1 if you want more verbose notices like what FreeNAS does (scrub notifications, for example.)

After modifying /etc/zfs/zed.d/zed.rc, restart zed:

systemctl restart zfs-zed

Scrubbing

By default ProxMox scrubs each of your datasets on the second Sunday of every month. This cron job is located in /etc/cron.d/zfsutils-linux. Modify to your liking.

Snapshot & Replication

There are many different snapshot & replication scripts out there. I landed on Sanoid. Thanks to SvennD for helping me grasp how to get it working.

Install sanoid :

#Install necessary packages
apt install debhelper libcapture-tiny-perl libconfig-inifiles-perl pv lzop mbuffer git
# Clone repo, build deb, install
git clone https://github.com/jimsalterjrs/sanoid.git cd sanoid
ln -s packages/debian . 
dpkg-buildpackage -uc -us 
apt install ../sanoid_*_all.deb 

Snapshots

Edit /etc/sanoid/sanoid.conf with a backup and retention schedule for each of your datasets. Example taken from sanoid documentation:

[data/home]
	use_template = production
[data/images]
	use_template = production
	recursive = yes
	process_children_only = yes
[data/images/win7]
	hourly = 4

#############################
# templates below this line #
#############################

[template_production]
        frequently = 0
        hourly = 36
        daily = 30
        monthly = 3
        yearly = 0
        autosnap = yes
        autoprune = yes

Once sanoid.conf is to your liking, create a cron job to launch sanoid every hour (sanoid determines whether any action is needed when executed.)

crontab -e
#Add this line, save and exit
0 * * * * /usr/sbin/sanoid --cron

Replication

syncoid (part of sanoid) easily replicates snapshots. The syntax is pretty straightforward:

syncoid <source> <destination> -r 
#-r means recursive and is optional

For remote locations specify a username@ before the ip/hostname, then a colon and the dataset name, for example:

syncoid root@10.0.0.1:sourceDataset localDataset -r

You can even have a remote source go to a different remote destination, which is pretty neat.

Other syncoid options of interest:

--debug  #for seeing everything happening, useful for logging
--exclude #Regular expression to exclude certain datasets
--src-bwlimit #Set an upload limit so you don't saturate your bandwidth
--quiet #don't output anything unless it's an error

Automate synchronization by placing the same syncoid command into a cronjob:

0 */4 * * * /usr/sbin/syncoid --exclude=bigdataset1 --source-bwlimit=1M --recursive pool/data root@192.168.1.100:pool/data
#if you don't want status emails when the cron job runs, add --quiet

NFS

Install the nfs-kernel-server package and specify your NFS exports in /etc/exports.

apt install nfs-kernel-server portmap

Example /etc/exports :

/mnt/example/DIR1 192.168.0.0/16(rw,sync,all_squash,anonuid=0,anongid=0)

Restart nfs-server after modifying your exports:

systemctl restart nfs-server

Samba

Install samba, configure /etc/samba/smb.conf, and add users.

apt install samba
systemctl enable smbd

/etc/samba/smb.conf syntax is fairly straightforward. See the samba documentation for more information. Example share configuration:

[exampleshare]
comment = Example share
path = /mnt/example
valid users = user1 user2
writable = yes

Add users to the system itself with the adduser command:

adduser user1

Add those same users to samba with the smbpasswd -a command. Example:

smbpasswd -a user1

Restart samba after making changes:

systemctl restart smbd

SMART monitoring

Taken from https://pve.proxmox.com/wiki/Disk_Health_Monitoring:

By default, smartmontools daemon smartd is active and enabled, and scans the disks under /dev/sdX and /dev/hdX every 30 minutes for errors and warnings, and sends an e-mail to root if it detects a problem. 

Edit the file /etc/smartd.conf to suit your needs. You can specify/exclude devices, smart attributes, etc there. See here for more information. Restart the smartd service after modifying.

UPS monitoring

apc-upsd was easiest for me to configure, so I went with it. Thanks to this blog for giving me the information to get started.

First, install apcupsd:

apt install apcupsd apcupsd-doc

As soon as it was installed my console kept getting spammed about IRQ issues. To stop these errors I stopped the apcupsd daemon:

 systemctl stop apcupsd

Now modify /etc/apcupsd/apcupssd.conf to suit your needs. The section I added for my CyberPower OR2200LCDRT2U was simply:

UPSTYPE usb
DEVICE

Then modify /etc/default/apcupsd to specify it’s configured:

#/etc/default/apcupsd
ISCONFIGURED=yes

After configuring, you can restart the apcupsd service

systemctl start apcupsd

To check the status of your UPS, you can run the apcaccess status command:

/sbin/apcaccess status

Log monitoring

Install Logwatch to monitor system events. Here is a good primer on all of Logwatch’s options.

apt install logwatch

Modify /usr/share/logwatch/default.conf/logwatch.conf to suit your needs. By default it runs daily (defined in /etc/cron.daily/00logwatch). I added the following lines for my config to filter out unwanted information:

Service = "-zz-disk_space"
Service = "-postfix"
Service = "vsmartd"
Service = "-zz-lm_sensors"

Manually run logwatch to get a preview of what you’ll see:

logwatch --range today --mailto 

Troubleshooting

ZFS-ZED not sending email

If ZED isn’t sending emails it’s likely due to an error in the config. For some reason default values still need to be uncommented for zed to work, even if left unaltered. Thanks to this post for the info.

Samba share access denied

If you get access denied when trying to write to a SMB share, double check the file permissions on the server level. Execute chmod / chown as appropriate. Example:

chown user1 -R /mnt/example/user1

Change ZFS based NFS SR address in Xenserver

I recently acquired a shiny new set of SSDs to host my VMs. The problem is I needed to create a new ZFS array to accommodate them. I needed to figure out a way to migrate my VMs to the new array and then instruct Xenserver to use the new array instead of the old one.

Fortunately with a bit of research I learned this is fairly painless. Thanks to this discussion on citrix forums that got me pointed in the right direction. To change the server / IP address of an existing NFS storage repository in Xenserver you must do the following:

  • Shut down affected VMs
  • Shutdown any VMs using NFS SRs
  • Copy the NFS SRs (the directories containing the .vhd files) to the new NFS server
  • xe pbd-unplug uuid=<uuid of pbd pointing to the NFS SR>
  • xe pbd-destroy uuid=<uuid of pbd pointing to the NFS SR>
  • xe pbd-create host-uuid=<uuid of Xen Host> sr-uuid=<uuid of the NFS SR> device-config-server=<New NFS server name> device-config-serverpath=<NFS Share Name>
  • xe pbd-plug uuid=<uuid of the pbd created above>
  • Reboot the VMs using NFS SRs

In my case since my VMs were on an existing ZFS volume with snapshots I wanted to preserve, I used ZFS send and receive to transfer data from my old array to my SSD array. Bonus: I was able to do this while the VMs were still running to ensure minimal downtime. My ZFS copy procedure was as follows:

  • Create recursive snapshot of my VM dataset
    zfs snapshot -r storage/VMs@migrate
  • Start the initial data transfer (this took quite some time to finish)
    zfs send -R storage/VMs@migrate | zfs recv ssd/VMs
  • Do another incremental snapshot and transfer after initial huge transfer is complete (this took much less time to do)
    zfs snapshot -r storage/VMs@migrate2
    zfs send -R -i storage/VMs@migrate storage/VMs@migrate2 | zfs recv ssd/VMs
  • Shutdown all affected VMs and do one more ZFS snapshot & transfer to ensure consistent data:
    zfs snapshot -r storage/VMs@migrate3
    zfs send -R -i storage/VMs@migrate2 storage/VMs@migrate3 | zfs recv ssd/VMs

In the above examples my source dataset was storage/VMs and the destination dataset was ssd/VMs.

Once the data was all transferred to the new location it was time to tell Xenserver about it. I had enough VMs that it was worth my time to write a little script to do it. It’s quick and dirty but it did the job. Behold:

#!/bin/bash
#Author: Nicholas Jeppson
#A simple script to change a xenserver NFS storage repository address to a new location
#Modify NFS_SERVER, NFS_PATH and/or NFS_VERSION to match your environment. 
#Run this script on each xenserver host in your pool. Empty output means the transfer was successful.
#This script takes one argument - the name of the SR to be transferred.

SR_NAME="$1"

NFS_SERVER=10.0.0.1
NFS_PATH=/mnt/ssd/VMs/$SR_NAME
NFS_VERSION=4

#Use sed and awk to grab necessary UUIDs
HOST_UUID=$(xe host-list|egrep -B3 `hostname`$ | grep uuid | awk '{print $5}')
PBD_UUID=$(xe pbd-list|grep -A4 -B4 $SR_NAME | grep -B2 $HOST_UUID |grep -w '^uuid ( RO)' | awk '{print $5}')
SR_UUID=$(xe pbd-list|grep -A4 -B4 $SR_NAME | grep -A2 $HOST_UUID | grep 'sr-uuid' | awk '{print $4}')

#Unplug & destroy old NFS location, create new NFS location
xe pbd-unplug uuid=$PBD_UUID
xe pbd-destroy uuid=$PBD_UUID
NEW_PBD_UUID=$(xe pbd-create host-uuid=$HOST_UUID sr-uuid=$SR_UUID device-config-server=$NFS_SERVER device-config-serverpath=$NFS_PATH device-config-nfsversion=$NFS_VERSION)
xe pbd-plug uuid=$NEW_PBD_UUID

Download the script here (right click / save as)

You can run this script in a simple for loop with something like this:

for SR in <list of SR names separated by a space>; do bash <name of script saved from above> $SR; done

If you named the above script nfs-migrate.sh, and you had three SRs to change (blog1, blog2, blog3) then it would be:

for SR in blog1 blog2 blog3; do bash nfs-migrate.sh $SR; done

After I migrated the data and ran that script, my VMs booted up using the new SSD array. Success.

Xenserver NFS SR from FreeNAS VM hack

I have a Citrix xenserver 6.5 host which hosts a FreeNAS VM that exports an NFS share. I then have that same xenserver host use that NFS export as a SR for other VMs on that same server. It’s unusual, but it saves me from buying a separate server for VM storage.

The problem is if you reboot the hypervisor it will fail to connect to the NFS export (because the VM hosting it hasn’t booted yet.) Additionally it appears Xenserver does not play well at all with hung NFS mounts. If you try to shutdown or reboot your FreeNAS VM while Xenserver is still using its NFS export, things start to freeze. You will be unable to do anything to any of your VMs thanks to the hung NFS share. It’s a problem!

My hack around this mess is to have FreeNAS, not Xenserver, control starting and stopping these VMs.

First, create public/private key pair for ssh into xenserver

ssh-keygen

This will generate two files, a private key file and a public (.pub) file. Copy the contents of the .pub file into the xenserver’s authorized_keys file:

echo "PUT_RSA_PUBLIC_KEY_HERE" >> /root/.ssh/authorized_keys

Copy the private key file (same name but without .pub extension) somewhere on your FreeNAS VM.

Next, create NFS startup and shutdown scripts. Thanks to linuxcommando for some guidance with this.  Replace the -i argument with the path to your SSH private key file generated earlier. You will also need to know the PBD UUID of the NFS store. Discover this by issuing

xe pbd-list

Copy the UUID for use in the scripts.

vi nfs-startup.sh
#!/bin/bash
#NFS FreeNAS VM startup script

SSH_COMMAND="ssh -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no -i <PRIVATE_KEY_LOCATION> -l root <ADDRESS_OF_XENSERVER>"

#Attach NFS drive first, then start up NFS-reliant VMs
$SSH_COMMAND xe pbd-plug uuid=<UUID_COPIED_FROM_ABOVE>

sleep 10

#Issue startup commands for each of your NFS-based VMs, repeat for each VM you have
$SSH_COMMAND xe vm-start vm="VM_NAME"
...
vi nfs-shutdown.sh
#!/bin/bash
#NFS FreeNAS VM shutdown script
#Shut down NFS-reliant VMs, detach NFS SR

#Re-establish networking to work around the fact that Network goes down before this script is executed within FreeNAS
/sbin/ifconfig -l | /usr/bin/xargs -n 1 -J % /sbin/ifconfig % up
SSH_COMMAND="ssh -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no -i <PRIVATE_KEY_LOCATION> -l root <ADDRESS_OF_XENSERVER>"

#Issue shutdown commands for each of your VMs
$SSH_COMMAND xe vm-shutdown vm="VM_NAME"

sleep 60

$SSH_COMMAND xe pbd-unplug <UUID_OF_NFS_SR>

#Take the networking interfaces back down for shutdown
/sbin/ifconfig -l | /usr/bin/xargs -n 1 -J % /sbin/ifconfig % down

Don’t forget to mark them executable:

chmod +x nfs-startup.sh
chmod +x nfs-shutdown.sh

Now add the scripts as a startup task in FreeNAS  and shutdown task respectively by going to System / Init/Shutdown Scripts. For startup, Select Type: Script, Type: postinit and point it to your nfs-startup.sh script. For shutdown, select Type: Script and Type: Shutdown.

Success! Now whenever your FreeNAS VM is shut down or rebooted, things will be handled properly which will prevent your hypervisor from freezing.

 

Improve FreeNAS NFS performance in Xenserver

My home lab consists of a virtualized instance of freenas, Citrix Xenserver, and various VMs. Recently I wanted to migrate some of my VMs to an NFS export from FreeNAS. To my dismay, the speed was abysmal (3 MB/second write speeds.) This tutorial will walk you through how to improve FreeNAS NFS performance in Xenserver by adding an log device (ZIL) to your ZFS pool.

After much research I realized the problem lies with ZFS behind the NFS export. Xenserver mounts the NFS share in such a way that it constantly wants to synchronize writes, which slows things down.

The solution: add a ZIL device. Since my freeNAS is virtualized, I chose the route of adding a virtual disk that is attached to an SSD. This process wasn’t straightforward.  If you have a virtual FreeNAS this is how to improve NFS performance:

  1. Add a disk in xenserver. Rule of thumb for size is half the amount of system RAM. I added 16GB ZIL disk to be safe.
  2. Add the following tunables in FreeNAS (to allow the OS to properly see xen hard drives)
    1. hint.ada.0.at, scbus100 (for the FreeNAS OS disk)
    2. hint.ada.1.at, scbus100 (for the newly added ZIL disk)
  3. Reboot FreeNAS
  4. In the FreeNAS GUI, click the ZFS Volume Manager, select your volume to expand from the dropdown, and select the device to be a LOG volume (ZIL)

That’s it! Once I added an SSD based ZIL device for my ZFS pool, NFS writes went from 3 MB/s to 60 MB/s. Awesome.