Tag Archives: SSL

CentOS7, nginx, reverse proxy, & let’s encrypt

With the loss of trust of Startcom certs I found myself needing a new way to obtain free SSL certificates. Let’s Encrypt is perfect for this. Unfortunately SophosUTM does not support Let’s Encrypt. It became time to replace Sophos as my reverse proxy. Enter nginx.

The majority of the information I used to get this up and running came from digitalocean with help from howtoforge. My solution involves CentOS7, nginx, and the let’s encrypt software.

Install necessary packages

sudo yum install nginx letsencrypt
sudo firewall-cmd --add-service=http --permanent
sudo firewall-cmd --add-service=https --permanent
sudo systemctl enable nginx

Inform selinux to allow nginx to make http network connections:

sudo setsebool -P httpd_can_network_connect 1

Generate certificates

Generate your SSL certificates with the letsencrypt command. This command relies on being able to reach your site over the internet using port 80 and public DNS. Replace arguments below to reflect your setup

sudo letsencrypt certonly -a webroot --webroot-path=/usr/share/nginx/html -d example.com -d www.example.com

The above command places the certs in /etc/letsencrypt/live/<domain_name>

Sophos UTM certificates

In my case I had a few paid SSL certificates I wanted to copy over from Sophos UTM to nginx. In order to do this I had to massage them a little bit as outlined here.

Download p12 from Sophos, also download certificate authority file, then use openssl to convert the p12 to a key bundle nginx will take.

openssl pkcs12 -nokeys -in server-cert-key-bundle.p12 -out server.pem
openssl pkcs12 -nocerts -nodes -in server-cert-key-bundle.p12 -out server.key
cat server.pem Downloaded_CA_file.pem > server-ca-bundle.pem

Once you have your keyfiles you can copy them wherever you like and use them in your site-specific SSL configuration file.

Auto renewal

First make sure that the renew command works successfully:

sudo letsencrypt renew

If the output is a success (a message saying not up for renewal) then add this to a cron job to check monthly for renewal:

sudo crontab -e
30 2 1 * * /usr/bin/letsencrypt renew >> /var/log/le-renew.log
35 2 1 * * /bin/systemctl reload nginx

Configure nginx

Uncomment the https settings block in /etc/nginx/nginx.conf to allow for HTTPS connections.

Generate a strong DH group:

sudo openssl dhparam -out /etc/ssl/certs/dhparam.pem 2048

Create SSL conf snippets in /etc/nginx/conf.d/ssl-<sitename>.conf. Make sure to include the proper location of your SSL certificate files as generated with the letsencrypt command.

ssl_certificate /etc/letsencrypt/live/example.com/fullchain.pem;
ssl_certificate_key /etc/letsencrypt/live/example.com/privkey.pem;
ssl_dhparam /etc/ssl/certs/dhparam.pem;

Here is a sample ssl.conf file:

server {
        listen 443;

        ssl_certificate /etc/letsencrypt/live/<HOSTNAME>/fullchain.pem;
        ssl_certificate_key /etc/letsencrypt/live/<HOSTNAME>/privkey.pem;
        ssl_dhparam /etc/ssl/certs/dhparam.pem;

        access_log /var/log/<HOSTNAME.log>;

        server_name <HOSTNAME>;

        location / {
                proxy_set_header Host $host;
                proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
                proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
                proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-Proto $scheme;

                proxy_pass http://<BACKEND_HOSTNAME>/;
        }
}

 

Redirect http to https by creating a redirect configuration file (optional)

sudo vim /etc/nginx/conf.d/redirect.conf
server {
	server_name
		<DOMAIN_1>
                ...
		<DOMAIN_N>;

        location /.well-known {
              alias /usr/share/nginx/html/.well-known;
              allow all;
	}
	location / {
               return 301 https://$host$request_uri; 
	}
}

 

Restart nginx:

sudo systemctl restart nginx

Troubleshooting

HTTPS redirects always go to the host at the top of the list

Solution found here:  use the $host variable instead of the $server_name variable in your configuration.

Websockets HTTP 400 error

Websockets require a bit more massaging in the configuration file as outlined here. Modify your site-specific configuration to add these lines:

# we're in the http context here
map $http_upgrade $connection_upgrade {
  default upgrade;
  ''      close;
}

server {     proxy_set_header Upgrade $http_upgrade;
    proxy_set_header Connection $connection_upgrade;
}

 

Fix Plex SSL behind Reverse Proxy

Recently I updated to the latest version of Plex. I run Plex behind a Reverse Proxy server. When I initially set it up it was to provide HTTPS before Plex supported it. Now that Plex supports it I still use it to have my custom domain name attached to it.

This latest Plex update seemed to have broken SSL connectivity completely.. I couldn’t get SSL to work no matter what I tried. After pulling much hair out I found out there is a new option under advanced server settings:

Settings / Server / Show Advanced / Network

Scroll downs until you see

Custom server access URLs

It is here that you need to supply your own domain name and port. I struggled this for a while. If you type https://<domain name>, but don’t specify a port, it defaults to 32400, not 443. I finally got SSL to work with plex again by entering https://mydomain.name:443 in that field.

Plex works with SSL once more. All is right with the world again.

Get free SSL certificates from startssl

SSL certificates can be a pain, especially if you have to pay for them. It turs out you can get free SSL certificates from startssl.com, though, so at least your wallet doesn’t have to suffer!

In order to create an account with them, head over to https://www.startssl.com/ Their account creation process is a little strange. Follow their instructions for generating a certificate for authentication (they don’t use passwords.)

Note: if you are getting frustrated because you follow their certificate login process only to have your browser tell you there is no cert it’s likely due to some caching of the certificate error page in your browser. Clear cache and cookies (or open a browser in incognito / privacy mode) and try again to log in.

First, validate your domain using their validation wizard. Once your domain is validated, head over to the Certificates wizard to generate a certificate.

I don’t trust any website that generates private SSL keys for you, so I recommend you create your own with the openssl command (steps copied from my sophos SSL certificate tutorial) and skip the creation step on their website.

  1. Generate a Certificate Signing Request (CSR) by creating a key and using it to generate the CSR
  2. openssl genrsa -aes256 -out <keyname>.key 2048
    openssl req -new -key keyname.key -out csrname.csr

2. Copy the content of the csr file into the CSR form box and click Next

3. If you’re lucky, you’ll be provided the key files immediately. Sometimes it takes a few hours for them to approve the certificate creation first.

4. Once the certificate is created, head over to Toolbox / Retrieve certificate. After selecting the appropriate certificate, copy everything in the box and paste it into a crt file.

5. Obtain Startcom’s intermediate and root CA files by going to Toolbox / Startcom CA Certificates. Download the “Server Certificate Bundle with CRLs” file.

6. Combine the generated certificate and Startcom certificate bundle into a single file:

cat ca-bundle.pem generated_crt_file.crt  > combined.crt

Sometimes you will need to wait 6-12 hours after getting key before installing it. This allows for OCSP to propagate as explained here. If you get certificate errors after installing, this may be the cause.

7. Profit.

 

 

Generate SSL certificate for use with Sophos UTM

HTTPS certificate handling in Sophos UTM is a bit different than other systems. I do this often enough but never remember exactly how to do it.

Here are the “cliff notes” of getting an SSL certificate loaded into Sophos UTM. This can be done on any linux / unix system with openssl installed. The full guide was taken from here.

Generate a private key

When creating your key, make sure you use a passphrase.

openssl genrsa -aes256 -out <keyname>.key 2048

Create a certificate signing request (CSR)

openssl req -new -key keyname.key -out csrname.csr

Upload CSR to your certificate company

Sophos UTM uses Openssl so select that option if prompted by your certificate company Specify Apache CSR if asked. Validate your domain ownership, then wait for e-mail with response.

Download output from certificate company

If they give you a zip file, unzip it first

unzip file_from_authority.zip

Combine all files provided into one

You only have to do this if your CA provides more than one CRT file

cat CA1.crt CA2.crt ...   >  combined.crt

Generate p12 file for use with UTM

Generate a pkcs12 file by supplying all files generated above. Be sure to specify an export password (Sophos requires one.)

openssl pkcs12 -export -in combined.crt -inkey <keyname>.key -out desired_p12_file_name.p12

Upload into Sophos UTM

Navigate to certificate management and specify upload key. Upload the file. Be sure to enter the password you used when creating the key earlier.

That’s it!