Category Archives: CLI

Quickly create xen disk images with dd

To this point I have been creating disk images with dd – pretty standard. The command I traditionally use is this:

sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=pc-bsd-10.1.img bs=1M count=40000

This command works but it takes some time as dd copies zeroes for every single part of the image.

It turns out that there is a much faster way to create a disk image, which I found out thanks to this article. Still using dd, you can simply use the -seek parameter to very quickly create your image

sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=pc-bsd-10.1.img bs=1 count=1 seek=40G

By setting bs and count to 1 but seek to 40G I have created a 40 gigabyte empty file image without having to wait for all those pesky zeroes to be written. Awesome.

Redshift – a better flux program for Linux

F.lux is a wonderful tool for helping eye strain. People who stare at computer screens all day (like myself) can experience quite a bit of eye strain due to the harsh lights screens emit. One solution is to wear yellow tinted gamer goggles. I chose the cheaper route, installing software to adjust the color temperature of your monitor. Flux does this beautifully.. for Windows, at least.

Linux is a different story. Its GUI is pretty flaky and appears to only work for one screen. Enter Redshift, an updated fork of the Linux port of F.lux, which properly supports dual monitors. Unfortunately, it is harder to configure than F.lux. It is a command line only tool (with a GUI indicator component) and it requires creating a manual configuration file.

On my Linux Mint system (Ubuntu based) I needed to install the following:

sudo apt-get install redshift gtk-redshift

I had a hard time getting day/night changes to work. Redshift allows you to specify several different location options, but none of them appeared to work for me. I then realized that I like the softer colors of redshift all the time so I simply set the same temperature for day or night. It now doesn’t matter what the latitude / longitude is.

I found it odd that the settings for flux and redshift don’t appear to be the same. I tweaked my config a little bit to best closely match my Windows f.lux setup. Below is my config file, placed in ~/.config/redshift.conf.

; Global settings for redshift
[redshift]
; Set the day and night screen temperatures

temp-day=4500
temp-night=4500

; Enable/Disable a smooth transition between day and night
; 0 will cause a direct change from day to night screen temperature.
; 1 will gradually increase or decrease the screen temperature
transition=1

; Set the screen brightness. Default is 1.0
;brightness=0.9
; It is also possible to use different settings for day and night since version 1.8.
;brightness-day=0.7
;brightness-night=0.4
; Set the screen gamma (for all colors, or each color channel individually)
gamma=0.8
;gamma=0.8:0.7:0.8

; Set the location-provider: 'geoclue', 'gnome-clock', 'manual'
; type 'redshift -l list' to see possible values
; The location provider settings are in a different section.
location-provider=manual

; Set the adjustment-method: 'randr', 'vidmode'
; type 'redshift -m list' to see all possible values
; 'randr' is the preferred method, 'vidmode' is an older API
; but works in some cases when 'randr' does not.
; The adjustment method settings are in a different section.
adjustment-method=randr

; Configuration of the location-provider:
; type 'redshift -l PROVIDER:help' to see the settings
; ex: 'redshift -l manual:help'
[manual]
lat=40
lon=110

; Configuration of the adjustment-method
; type 'redshift -m METHOD:help' to see the settings
; ex: 'redshift -m randr:help'
; In this example, randr is configured to adjust screen 1.
; Note that the numbering starts from 0, so this is actually the second screen.
[randr]
screen=0

After saving the config file you can add gtx-flux  gtk-redshift as a startup application to have it automatically load on startup. My eyes feel much more comfortable now.

 

 

Manipulate EXIF data with jhead

From time to time I find I need to edit the date taken metadata on pictures. I’ve discovered that jhead is a wonderful tool to accomplish this. It has many options, but the ones I use most frequently are the following:

  • mkexif Create EXIF data for a picture that does not contain it
  • -ft Set picture’s filesystem modified date to match the EXIF date taken contained in the picture
  • dsft Set the EXIF date taken date of the picture to match the modified time of the filesystem for that picture

You can use wildcards, which is super convenient. To create metadata for all JPG files in a current directory:

jhead -mkexif *.JPG

I like to use touch in conjunction with jhead to set exif picture taken times for files that don’t have any metadata but I know the date they were taken:

jhead -mkexif *.jpg
touch -t 201410201700 *.jpg
jhead -dsft *.jpg

For pictures which have correct metadata but incorrect modified date (downloaded pictures, for example) simply do the following:

jhead -ft *.jpg

Neat.

Update 7/15/2018

I came across this helpful article which outlines how to view exif information from the command line using the identify command. It requires that imagemagick be installed.

identify -verbose *.jpg | grep "exif:"

Update 12/9/2018

This is the syntax I use to set the time of the picture to a specific date:

jhead -tsYYYY:MM:DD-HH:mm:ss <filename>

Unzip multiple files into a single directory

Occasionally I have a need to unzip multiple zip files into a single directory, renaming any files with duplicate names so all zip contents end up in the same directory. I accomplish this in a lazy fashion with find and unzip.

First, put all the zip files you need to extract in the same folder. I used find with the -ctime flag to find files created today (as those are the ones I want.) I use the -exec flag to execute a command on the resulting files; in this case, the unzip program with the -B flag, which doesn’t overwrite files with duplicate names, and the -d flag to specify which folder to extract to:

find *.zip -ctime 1 unzip -B {} -d example/ \;

This finds and unzips all my files, but there is a catch: files with the same filename have been renamed with tildes at the end of each file, for example pic1.jpg~. I do another quick find operation to simply tack .jpg to the end of each of these files

find example/ -name "*~*" -exec mv {} {}.jpg \;

The result is a directory full of the files you desire. My case is very simplistic as it assumes that all files in each zip file are of the same extension. You could use something like awk to parse the result of find command and re-add appropriate extensions, but I won’t detail that here (see laziness reference above.)

 

Manipulate dd output with sed, tr, and awk

While improving a backup script I came across a need to modify the information output by the dd command. FreeNAS, the system the script runs on, does not have a version of dd that has the human readable option. My quest: make the output from dd human readable.

I’ve only partially fulfilled this quest at this point, but the basic functionality is there. The first step is to redirect all output of the dd command (both stdout and stderr) to a variable (this particular syntax is for bash)

DD_OUTPUT=$(dd if=/dev/zero of=test.img bs=1000000 count=1000 2>&1)

The 2>&1 redirects all output to the variable instead of the console.

The next step is to use sed to remove unwanted information (number records in and out)

sed -r '/.*records /d'

Next, remove any parenthesis. This is due to the parenthesis from dd output messing up the math that’s going to be done later.

tr -d '()'

-d ‘()’ simply tells tr to remove any instance of the characters between the single quotes.

And now, for awk. Awk allows you to manipulate certain pieces of a text file. Each section, separated by a space, is known as a record. Awk lets us edit some parts of text while keeping others intact. My expertise with awk is that of a n00b so I’m sure there is a more efficient way of doing this; nevertheless here is my solution:

awk '{print ($1/1024)/1024 " MB" " " $3 " " $4 " " $5*60 " minutes"  " (" ($7/1024)/1024 " MB/sec)" }'

Since dd outputs its information in bytes I’m having it divide by 1024 twice so the resulting number is now in megabytes. I also have it divide the seconds by 60 to return the number of minutes dd took. Additionally I’m re-inserting the parenthesis removed by the tr command now that the math is correctly done.

The last step is to pipe all of this together:

DD_OUTPUT=$(dd if=/dev/zero of=test.img bs=1000000 count=10000 2>&1)
DD_HUMANIZED=$(echo "$DD_OUTPUT" | sed -r '/.*records /d' | tr -d '()' | awk '{print ($1/1024)/1024 " MB" " " $3 " " $4 " " $5/60 " minutes"  " (" ($7/1024)/1024 " MB/sec)" }')

After running the above here are the results:

Original output:

echo "$DD_OUTPUT"
10000+0 records in
10000+0 records out
10000000000 bytes transferred in 103.369538 secs (96740299 bytes/sec)

Humanized output:

echo "$DD_HUMANIZED"
9536.74 MB transferred in 1.72283 minutes (92.2587 MB/sec)

The printf function of awk would allow us to round the calculations but I couldn’t quite get the syntax to work and have abandoned the effort for now.

Of course all this is not necessary if you have the correct dd version. The GNU version of dd defaults to human readability; certain BSD versions have the option of passing the msgfmt=human argument per here.


Update: I discovered that the awk method above will only print the one line it finds and ignore all other lines, which is less than ideal for scripting. I updated the awk syntax to do a search and replace (sub) instead so that it will print all other lines as well:

awk '{sub(/.*bytes /, $1/1024/1024" MB "); sub(/in .* secs/, "in "$5/60" mins "); sub(/mins .*/, "mins (" $7/1024/1024" MB/sec)"); printf}')

My new all in one line is:

DD_HUMANIZED=$(echo "$DD_OUTPUT" | sed -r '/.*records /d' | tr -d '()' | awk '{sub(/.*bytes /, $1/1024/1024" MB "); sub(/in .* secs/, "in "$5/60" mins "); sub(/mins .*/, "mins (" $7/1024/1024" MB/sec)"); printf}')

Verify backup integrity with rsync, sed, cat, and tee

Recently it became apparent that a large data transfer I did might have had some errors. I wanted to find an easy way to compare the source and destination to make sure that they were identical. My solution: rsync, sed, cat and tee

I have used rsync quite a bit but did not know about the –checksum flag until recently. When you run rsync with –checksum, it takes much longer, but it effectively does something similar to what a ZFS scrub does – it runs a checksum of every source file and compares it with the checksum of each destination file.  If there is a mismatch, rsync will overwrite the destination file with the source file to correct it.

In my situation I performed a large data migration from my old mdadam-based RAID array to my brand new ZFS array. During the transfer the disks were acting very strange, and at one point one of the disks even popped out of the array. The culprit turned out to be a faulty SATA controller. I bought a cheap 4 port SATA controller from Amazon for my new ZFS array. Do not do this! Spring the cash out for a better controller. The cheap ones, this one at least, only caused headache. I removed it and used the on-board SATA ports on my motherboard and the issues went  away.

All of those shennanigans made me wonder if there was corrupt data on my new ZFS array. A ZFS scrub repaired 15.5G of data! While I’m sure that fixed a lot of the issues, I realized there probably was still some corruption. This is how I verified it

rsync -Pahn --checksum /path/to/source /path/to/destination | tee migration.txt

-P shows progress, -a means archive, -h is for human readable measurements, and -n means dry run (don’t actually copy anything)

Tee is a cool utility that allows you to redirect output of a command both to a file and to standard output. This is useful if you want to see the verification take place in real time but also want to analyze it later.

After the comparison (which took a while!) I wanted to see the discrepancies. the -P flag lists each directory rsync checks as well as which files it detected. You can use sed in conjunction with cat to weed out the unwanted lines (directory listings) so that only the files with discrepancies are left.

 cat pictures.txt | sed '/\/$/d' | tee pictures-truncated.txt

The sed regex simply looks for any line ending in a / (directory listing) and removes that line. What is left is the files in question. You can combine the entire thing into one line like so

rsync -Pahn --checksum /path/to/source /path/to/destination | sed '/\/$/d' | tee migration.txt

In my case I wanted to compare discrepencies with rsync and make decisions on if I wanted to actually fix the issues. If you are 100% sure the source is OK to remove the destination completely, you can simply run

rsync -Pah --checksum --delete /path/to/source /path/to/destination

ZFS remote replication script with reporting

In my experimentation with FreeNAS one thing I found lacking was the quality of reports it generated. I suppose one philosophy is that the smaller the e-mail the better, but my philosophy is that the e-mail should still be legible. Some of the e-mails I get from FreeNAS are simply bizarre and cryptic.

FreeNAS has an option to replicate your ZFS volumes to a remote source for backup. As far as I can tell there is no report e-mail when the replication is done, although there may be a cryptic e-mail if anything failed. I have grown used to daily status e-mails from my previous NAS solution (Debian with homegrown scripts.) I set out to do this with FreeNAS and added a few added features along the way.

My script requires that you have already created an appropriate user and private/public key pair for both the source and destination machines (to allow for passwordless logins.) Instructions on how to do this are detailed below. You can download the script here.

Notes and observations

I learned quite a bit when creating this script. The end result is a script that e-mails me a beautiful report telling me anything that was added or removed since the last backup.

  • I used dd for greater speed as suggested here
  • I learned from here that the -R switch for ZFS send sends the entire snapshot tree.
  • The ZFS diff command currently has a bug where it does not always report deleted files / folders. It was opened two years ago, closed, and then recently re-opened as it is still an issue. It is the reason my script uses both ZFS dff and rsync – so I can continually see the bug in action.
  • When dealing with rsync, remember the / at the end!
  • In bash you can pipe output from a command to a variable.
  • When echoing above variable, make sure you enclose it in quotes to preserve formatting.
  • Use the -r flag in sed -r for extended regex functions
  • In my testing the built in freeNAS replication script didn’t appear to replicated the latest snapshot. Interesting…

Below are the preliminary steps that are needed in order for the script to run properly.

Configure a user for replication

Create users

Either manually or through the FreeNAS UI, create a user that will run the backup script. Create that same user on the remote box (backup server.)

Generate RSA keys

Log into local host and generate RSA keys to allow for passwordless login to the system

cd .ssh
ssh-keygen

Make note of the filenames you gave it (the default is id-rsa and id-rsa.pub)

Authorize the resulting public key

Log into remote host and add the public key of local host in ~/username/.ssh/authorized_keys where username is the user you created above. One way to accomplish this is to copy the public key on the main server and paste it into the authorized keys file of the backup server.

On the main server

(assuming the keyfile name is id-rsa)

cd .ssh
less id-rsa.pub

Copy the output on the screen in its entirety

On the backup server

Paste that public key into the authorized_keys file of the backup user

cd .ssh
vi authorized_keys

Allow the new user to mount filesystems

FreeNAS requires you to specifically allow regular users to mount filesystems as described here.

  1. In the web interface under System > Sysctls > Add sysctl:
    Variable: vfs.usermount
    Value: 1
    Enabled: yes

Grant ZFS permissions to the new user

In order for the dataset creation (full backup) feature to work the user we’ve created needs to have specific ZFS permissions granted as outlined here.

Run this command on both the main and backup servers:

zfs allow backup create,destroy,snapshot,rollback,clone,promote,rename,mount,send,receive,quota,reservation,hold storage

where backup is the new user and storage is the dataset name. I’m pretty sure you can make those permissions a little more fine grained but I threw a bunch of them in there for simplicity’s sake.

Configure HP iLo (optional)

My current backup server is an old HP Proliant server equipped with HP iLo. I decided to add a section in my script that, when enabled in the variables section, would have the script use iLo to power the machine on. If you do not have / wish to use iLo to control your backup server you can skip this section.

First, create a user in ILo and grant it Virtual Power and Reset permissions (all the rest can be denied.)

Next, copy the .pub file you created earlier to your computer so you can go into iLo web interface and upload it. Make sure an iLo user exists and the last part  (the username) of the public key file matches exactly with the user you created in HP iLo.

When I first tried this no matter what I tried I couldn’t get passwordless login to work. After much weeping, wailing, and gnashing of teeth. I finally discovered from here that the -f and -C options of the ssh-keygen command are required for iLo to accept the key. I had to regenerate a private/public key pair via the following options, where backup is the user I created in iLo:

ssh-keygen -b 1024 -f backup -C backup

Find out free disk space from the command line

The du command can be used in any Unix shell to determine how much space a folder is taking. It’s a quick way to determine which directory is using the most space.

If you run du on the root drive “/” then you will get an idea of how much space the drive is using. One unfortunate side effect of that command is if you have any mounted drives or other filesystems, it will search the disk usage of those folders as well. Aside from taking a long time that method provides data we don’t necessarily want.

Fortunately, there are a few switches you can use to fix this problem. The -x switch tells du to ignore other filesystems. Perfect.

There are a few other switches that prove useful. Below is a list of my favorites:

  • -x Ignore other filesystems
  • -h Use human readable numbers (kilobytes, megabytes, and gigabytes) instead of raw bytes
  • -s Provide a summary of the folder instead of listing the size of each file inside the folder
  • * (not a switch, but rather an argument to put after your directory.) This summarizes subfolders in that directory, as opposed to simply returning the size of that directory.

For troubleshooting low disk space errors, the following command will give you a good place to start:

du -hsx /*

You can then dig further by altering the above command to reflect a directory instead of /, or simply do * if you want a breakdown of the directory you are currently in.

Compare two latest ZFS snapshots for differences

In my previous post about ZFS snapshots I discussed how to get the latest snapshot name. I came across a need to get the name of the second to last snapshot and then compare that with the latest. A little CLI kung-fu is required for this but nothing too scary.

The command of the day is: zfs diff.

zfs diff storage/mythTV@auto-20141007.1248-2h storage/mythTV@auto-20141007.1323-2h

If you get an error using zfs diff, you aren’t running as root. You will need to delegate the diff ZFS permission to the account you’re using:

zfs allow backup diff storage

where backup is the account you want to grant permissions for and storage is the dataset you want to grant permissions to.

The next step is to grab the two latest snapshots using the following commands.

Obtain latest snapshot:

zfs list -t snapshot -o name -s creation -r storage/Documents | tail -1

Obtain the second to latest snapshot:

zfs list -t snapshot -o name -s creation -r storage/Documents | tail -2 | sort -r | tail -1

Putting it together in one line:

zfs diff `zfs list -t snapshot -o name -s creation -r storage/Documents | tail -2 | sort -r | tail -1` `zfs list -t snapshot -o name -s creation -r storage/Documents | tail -1`

While doing some testing I came across an unfortunate bug with the ZFS diff function. Sometimes it won’t show files that have been deleted! It indicates that the folder where the deleted files were in was modified but doesn’t specify any further. This bug appears to affect all ZFS implementations per here and here. As of this writing there has been no traction on this bug. The frustrating part is the bug is over two years old.

The workaround for this regrettable bug is to use rsync  with the -n parameter to compare snapshots. -n indicates to only do a dry run and not actually try to copy anything.

To use Rsync for comparison, you have to do a little more CLI-fu to massage the output from the zfs list command so it’s acceptable to rsync as well as include the full mountpoint of both snapshots. When working with rsync, don’t forget the trailing slash.

rsync -vahn --delete /mnt/storage/Documents/.zfs/snapshot/`zfs list -t snapshot -o name -s creation -r storage/Documents | tail -2 | sort -r | tail -1 | sed 's/.*@//g'`/ /mnt/storage/Documents/.zfs/snapshot/`zfs list -t snapshot -o name -s creation -r storage/Documents | tail -1 | sed 's/.*@//g'`/

Command breakdown:

Rsync arguments:
-v means verbose (lists files added/deleted)
-a means archive (preserve permissions)
-h means human readable numbers
-n means do a dry run only (no writing)
–delete will delete anything in the destination that’s not in the source (but not really since we’re doing -n – it will just print what it would delete on the screen)

Sed arguments
/s search and replace
/.*@ simple regex meaning anything up to and including the @ sign
/  What comes after this slash is what we would like to replace what was matched in the previous command. In this case, we choose nothing, and move directly to the last argument
/g tells sed to keep looking for other matches (not really necessary if we know there is only one in the stream)

All these backticks are pretty ugly, so for readability sake, save those commands into variables instead. The following is how you would do it in bash:

FIRST_SNAPSHOT="`zfs list -t snapshot -o name -s creation -r storage/Documents | tail -2 | sort -r | tail -1 | sed 's/.*@//g'/`"
SECOND_SNAPSHOT="`zfs list -t snapshot -o name -s creation -r storage/Documents | tail -1 | sed 's/.*@//g'/`"
rsync -vahn --delete /mnt/storage/Documents/.zfs/snapshot/$FIRST_SNAPSHOT /mnt/storage/Documents/.zfs/snapshot/$SECOND_SNAPSHOT

I think I’ll stop for now.

Blow away ZFS snapshots and watch the progress

For the last month I have had a testing system (FreeNAS) take ZFS snapshots of sample datasets every five minutes. As you can imagine, the snapshot count has risen quite dramatically. I am currently at over 12,000 snapshots.

In testing a backup script I’m working on I’ve discovered that replicating 12,000 snapshots takes a while. The initial data transfer completes in a reasonable time frame but copying each subsequent snapshot takes more time than the original data. Consequently, I decided to blow away all my snapshots. It took a while! I devised this fun little way to watch the progress.

Open two terminal windows. In terminal #1, enter the following:

bash
while [ true ]; do zfs list -H -t snapshot | wc -l; sleep 6; done

The above loads BASH and the runs a simple loop to count the total number of snapshots on the system. The sleep command is only there because it takes a few seconds to return the results when you have more than 10,000 snapshots.

Alternatively you could make the output a little prettier by entering the following:

while [ true ]; do REMAINING="`zfs list -H -t snapshot | wc -l`"; echo "Snapshots remaining: $REMAINING" ; sleep 6; done

In terminal #2, enter the following (taken from here):

bash
for snapshot in `zfs list -H -t snapshot | cut -f 1`
do
zfs destroy $snapshot
done

You can now hide terminal#2 and observe terminal #1. It will show you how many snapshots are left, refreshing the number every 6 seconds. Neat.