windows 10 KERNEL_SECURITY_CHECK_FAILED in qemu vm

I upgraded to a shiny new AMD Ryzen 3rd gen processer (Threadripper 3960x.) After doing so I could not boot up my Windows 10 gaming VM (it uses VFIO / PCI Passthrough for the video card.) The message I kept getting as it tried to boot was:

KERNEL_SECURITY_CHECK_FAILED

After reading this reddit thread and this one It turns out it’s a culmination of a few things:

  • Running Linux kernel greater than 5.4
  • Running QEMU 5
  • Using 3rd gen AMD Ryzen CPU
  • Using host-passthrough CPU mode

The problem comes with a new speculative execution protection hardware feature in the Ryzen Gen 3 chipsets – stibp. Qemu doesn’t know how to handle it properly, thus the bluescreens.

There are two ways to fix it

  • Change host-model from host-passthrough to epyc
  • Add CPU parameters to your Virtual Machine’s XML file instructing it to not use the stibp CPU feature.

Since I have some software that checks CPU model and refuses to work if it’s not in the desktop class (Geforce Experience) I opted for route #2.

First, check the qemu logs to see which CPU parameters your VM was using (pick a time where it worked.) Replace ‘win10’ with the name of your VM.

sudo cat /var/log/libvirt/qemu/win10.log | grep "\-cpu"

in my case, it was -cpu host,migratable=on,topoext=on,kvmclock=on,hv-time,hv-relaxed,hv-vapic,hv-spinlocks=0x1fff,hv-vendor-id=1234567890ab,kvm=off \

Copy everything after -cpu and before the last backslash. Then edit your VM’s XML file (change last argument to the name of your VM)

sudo virsh edit win10

Scroll down to the bottom qemu:commandline section (if it doesn’t exist, create it right above the last line – </domain>. Paste the following information obtained from the above log (ignoring the qemu:commandline lines if they already exist.) In my case it looked like this:

  <qemu:commandline>
    <qemu:arg value='-cpu'/>
    <qemu:arg value='host,topoext=on,kvmclock=on,hv-time,hv-relaxed,hv-vapic,hv-
spinlocks=0x1fff,hv-vendor-id=1234567890ab,kvm=off,-amd-stibp'/>
  </qemu:commandline>

What you’re doing is copying the CPU arguments you found in the log and adding them to the qemu:commandline section, with a twist – adding -amd-stibp which instructs qemu to remove that CPU flag.

This did the trick for me!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.